Monday, February 26, 2018

Téada - Irish Ensemble to Perform at MCTA



Téada
Irish Traditional Music with a World-Wide Reach

Téada, a traditional Irish ensemble with a world-wide reach, will perform at Mountain City Traditional Arts, 25 E. Main Street, Frostburg, on Tuesday, March 6th at 7:30 pm. This is event is open to the public with a suggested donation of $15.

Dedicated to bringing the music of Ireland to audiences around the globe, Téada has appeared as a frequent headliner at major music festivals throughout the US, Canada, Téada Mexico, Europe, Africa, Russia, the Middle East and Australia. Just in time for St. Patrick’s Day, with funding from Culture Ireland, the group is making Frostburg a stop on its month-long tour of the Eastern US and Mid-Atlantic region.

This leg of the tour features a four piece line-up including Oisin Mac Diarmada, fiddle, Séamus Begley, vocals/button accordion, Seán McElwain, guitar, and Samantha Harvey, dance and accordion.  Together, they’ll deliver an exhilarating performance highlighting the enduring appeal of traditional Irish music and dance.

A graduate in Music Education from Trinity College Dublin/RIAM, Oisín Mac Diarmada has been described by The Irish Echo's Earle Hitchner as "one of the most gifted and creative traditional fiddlers playing today." Founder of noted group Téada in 2001, he is also a regular solo performer, having appeared as guest soloist with the Southern Georgia Symphony Orchestra (USA) and Würtembergische Philharmonie Orchestra (Germany) along with having an extensive recording history. He has recently published a new book – Fiddlers of Sligo Tunebook – along with fellow-Sligo musician, Daithí Gormley.

West Kerry legend, Séamus Begley, is the quintessential Irish musician, famous for his sharp wit and the beautiful sweetness of his voice, recognised in his recent 2013 Gradam Ceoil TG4 Traditional Singer of the Year award. Displaying a wonderful spontaneity in his accordion-playing, he has toured extensively with performers such as Altan, Steve Cooney and Mary Black. He has recorded numerous duet albums with guitarists such as Steve Cooney, Jim Murray and Tim Edey, and in early 2012 released a duet album with Oisín Mac Diarmada.

Seán McElwain from Monaghan brings a strong string dimension to Téada through his dynamic contributions on guitar. He is actively involved in the organizing and running of an annual weekend of music 'Scoil Cheoil na Botha' in his native county Monaghan and recently completed PhD research on the music of his local area. The CD project which emerged from this research received a prestigious TG4 Gradam Ceol Award for Collaboration in 2016. 

Samantha Harvey is an award-winning step dancer, pianist and accordionist. She has performed throughout the world. Most recently Samantha performed in RTÉ's Centenary 2016, broadcast live from the Bord Gáis Energy Theatre in Dublin and with the Omaha Symphony in A Celtic Journey.


Dedicated to the sales, education, documentation and perpetuation of the traditional arts, Mountain City Traditional Arts is a program of Frostburg State University, which receives support from the Maryland Traditions Program of the Maryland State Arts Council. For more information, call 301-687-8040.


Monday, January 8, 2018


Josephine County

Traditional Acoustic Music from Appalachia, Irish, Scottish and Beyond

Friday, February 23, 7:30 PM - Mountain City Traditional Arts

Josephine County combines the talents of four powerful traditional musicians into one exceptional musical experience ranging from the United States to Ireland and back. Award-winning fiddler and singer Erica Brown Shipman dedicated herself to traditional music at a very young age. Classical, French Canadian, Bluegrass, Country, and much more can be found in her wide-range of musical expertise. Songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Matt Shipman’s love of traditional music is apparent in his mastery of Bluegrass, Country, and Irish styles of playing. His detailed and thoughtful guitar, mandolin, and banjo playing captivate and delight audiences nationwide. Traditional Irish flute player and singer Hanz Araki is known worldwide for his fresh and innovative approach. His musical sensibility is both inspired and disciplined and has made him a household name from the UK to Japan. Among the finest interpreters of traditional songs of her generation, singer Colleen Raney brings warmth and authenticity to music from Ireland, Appalachia, Scotland, and beyond.

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Celtic Music Series

BUA -Sean Gavin  - flute, uilleann pipes, whistle, Brian Miller - guitar, bouzouki, Devin Shepherd -  fiddle, and Brian Ó hAirt - vocals, sean-nós dance, concertina

Sunday, September 10, 4:30 PM, $15 Suggested Donation 

Bua evokes the good times that are the core of Irish traditional music.  Precise, intense, and straight forward, they are a refreshing change in today’s highly polished musical world. Bua stands out among modern bands in the genre by staying strong in the path of the tradition, yet still able to “raise the rafters with their playing, charm with their singing, and delight with their contemporary energy.” (Dirty Linen)  The Irish Music Association awarded them Top Traditional Group of 2009. In Irish the name Bua means talent, merit, destiny, and more – they are well named.  http://buamusic.com/


Dublin-based Folk Singer Aoife Scott
Sunday, September 24, 3 PM, $15 Suggested Donation

From the family that brought you two of Ireland’s most treasured singers, Frances Black and Mary Black, please meet Aoife Scott, daughter of the former and niece of the latter, the next generation. Fragile and ethereal one minute and strong and vibrant the next, Dublin Folk singer-songwriter Aoife Scott has become a force to be reckoned with on the Irish folk and traditional scene.  https://www.aoifescott.com/
 

Barrule
October 19, 7:30 PM, $15 Suggested Donation


The unique sound of traditional Manx music is the Celtic World’s best kept secret. This is set to change with the introduction of Barrule, the award-winning trio hellbent on taking the Isle of Man’s music to a much wider audience. While sharing common ground with its Celtic cousins, Manx music has retained its own particular and inherent Manxness: an atmosphere evoked by the music that speaks of the natural beauty of the island and the lives of its inhabitants.  http://www.barruletrio.com/

Mountain City Traditional Arts is a program of Frostburg State University supported in part by the Maryland Traditions Program of the Maryland State Arts Council  and FrostburgFirst. For more information contact us at mountaincitytradarts@gmail.com or call 301-687-8040.

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Upcoming Events at MCTA

January 28th: Appalachian Dance Workshops, Clogging and Flat-footing

 Mountain City Traditional Arts, 25 E. Main Street, Frostburg, will offer Appalachian Dance Workshops- clogging and flat-footing! Workshops will be held on the second and fourth Saturdays of the month from 11 am to Noon, starting Saturday, January 28. Hard sole shoes are recommended. Donations of $10 per session are encouraged, though not required. No experience necessary. 

Instructor Catie Snider was born and raised in Cumberland, MD. It wasn't until she was living in Albuquerque in her mid 20s that she discovered clogging at the Albuquerque Folk Festival. She immediately started taking classes that mostly consisted of dance routines to country music songs. She continued taking classes when she was living in Missoula, MT and this is where she learned how to "flat foot." While living in Asheville, NC, she continued taking classes and began working on improv, simply dancing to live music. Catie returned to her hometown about 3 years ago and currently teaches anthropology and sociology classes at Potomac State College. She's eager to share her love of flat-footing with others.

February 4th: Maple Syrup Production in Western Maryland

​Mountain City Traditional Arts, 25 E. Main Street, Frostburg, will host the program, “Maple Syrup Production in Western Maryland,” on Saturday, February 4th at 2 pm. The event features recent Maryland Traditions Heritage Award Winners, Steyer Brothers Maple Syrup and S&S Maple Camp. Both were recognized by the Maryland Traditions Program of the Maryland State Arts Council for their roles in continuing the tradition of maple syrup making in western Maryland. In November, recipients traveled to Silver Spring, Maryland, to participate in a full program honoring 2016 recipients. The event at Mountain City Traditional Arts provides the local community with the opportunity to learn more about maple syrup productionin our region.

​The program is being presented as part of a partnership with the The Western Maryland Heritage Association, which is partnering with the Maryland Humanities Council to bring the Smithsonian Travelling exhibition, “The Way We Worked,” to western Maryland. The main exhibition will be hosted by the Allegany Museum in Cumberland, February-March. Additionally, six Allegany County museums and historic sites, will develop companion displays featuring labor and work themes.

"Maryland is home to a wealth of agricultural traditions, and one of the sweetest comes from the Appalachian west, where families like the Steyers and Shinholts have been passing down maple syrup harvesting practices for generations,” said Chad Buterbaugh, director of the Maryland Traditions Program, who will participate in the MCTA program. "We are truly pleased to recognize the Steyers and Shinholts for their work, and we are grateful for their participation in the Maryland Traditions program."

Maple Syrup production has a rich history in western Maryland, where operations perhaps numbered in the hundreds at one time. Only a handful of those remain today, with the Steyers and Shinholts being some of the few producers remaining to keep the tradition alive in western Maryland

“Wind from the North, sap comes forth.” “Wind from the West, sap runs best.” “Wind from the East, sap runs least.” “Wind from the South, sap is a drought,” Leo Shinholt, owner of S&S Maple Camp is fond of saying. When most residents of the region are still staying indoors and out of the winter weather, Leo Shinholt of Corriganville, in Allegany County and Michael and Randall Steyer and their families near Oakland, in Garrett County are walking miles, sometimes in snow shoes, to drill holes in Maple Trees, set taps and collect sap.

Sap can run for two months or more, from mid to late February through early April, but the sweet spot of that time frame, where sap runs best, may be only a third of that time. It’s during that intensity that running and boiling sap becomes a way of life in the Steyer and Shinolt families, both of which have been at it for three decades or more. Leo Shinholt learned the tradition from his grandfather; the Steyer family has been engaged in the practice for more than 100 years. In early Spring, the Sugar Camp becomes the hub of social activity for both families. Family and friends gather nightly to share stories, trade gossip, socialize while the sap is boiled down to produce syrup.
"The maple syrup making process represents ingenuity and entrepreneurial spirit, but it also provides a source of fellowship for the immediate and extended family members who come together each winter to participate in tapping, boiling, and bottling,” said Buterbaugh.

A program of Frostburg State University, Mountain City Traditional Arts is dedicated to the education, sales, documentation and perpetuation of the traditional arts in western Maryland.

February 24th: The April Verch Band

The April Verch Band will bring their world-class talent and dynamism to Mountain City Traditional Arts, 25 East Main Street Frostburg MD, on Friday February 24th at 7:30pm. This passionate and energetic trio has performed across the United State, Canada, Europe, Australia, and China. Their mastery of their instruments and stage presence has won over audiences worldwide. The performance has a suggested donation of $15.

April has been deeply immersed in traditional music since she was a young child in Ottawa Valley, Canada. With her family made up of musicians and teaching her to fiddle and stepdance at a very young age the path to becoming a professional musician was wide open to her. She has been touring full time since 2000, traveling all over the world and bringing her passion for her music to small rural communities as well as expansive concert halls. She has held classes and lectures, performed at numerous festival, and was even one of six fiddlers representing the Canadian fiddle tradition at the 2010 Olympic Winter Games. Her performances are executed with precision as she employs voice, dance, and her fiddle all at once.

Through all of her numerous accomplishments and skill April remains modest about her fame as she performs simply out of passion for the traditional music of her home. April will be releasing an album that represents all the greatest songs of her career so far in February of 2017.

Cody Walters, a native of rural Kansas, has been playing upright bass since 1999. He has played bass in a variety of musical styles including country, jazz, Latin, folk, old-time, and more with a variety of bands. He has recently become very accomplished with claw-hammer banjo, a welcome addition to The April Verch Band sound. He has been with the band since 2007 employing use of both his upright-electric bass and banjo.

Alex Rubin has been a member of the band since March of 2016 playing guitar and mandolin. Though he began exploring music through classical violin, he soon changed to focus on bluegrass guitar. After receiving his bachelors degree in biology he became immersed in the Boston bluegrass scene. He has studied with John McGann, performed in a folk duo with banjo player BB Bowness, and toured a variety of festivals and New Zealand.

Dedicated to the education, sales, documentation and perpetuation of the traditional arts in the mountain region, Mountain City Traditional Arts is a program of Frostburg State University, with support from FrostburgFirst, the Allegany Arts Council, and the Maryland Traditions Program of the State Arts Council. For more information contact mountaincitytradarts@gmail.com or call 301-687-8040.

FSU is committed to making all of its programs, services and activities accessible to persons with disabilities. To request accommodations through the ADA Compliance Office, call 301-687-4102 or use a Voice Relay Operator at 1-800-735-2258.


Thursday, September 29, 2016

Celtic Fiddle Festival to Perform at Frostburg’s Palace Theatre

Set to perform a “perfect storm of the finest Celtic music your ears will ever encounter,” the Celtic Fiddle Festival quartet will showcase a fascinating juxtaposition of international and individual styles in a concert at Frostburg’s historic Palace Theatre on Saturday, Oct. 8, at 7:30 p.m.
The group, which is touring the U.S., is made up of three fiddlers and an accompanying guitarist from various Celtic regions. The show is organized by Mountain City Traditional Arts, a program of Frostburg State University.
The Celtic Fiddle Festival released its first CD in 1993, beginning with two great friends and fiddlers – one Scottish, the other Irish. The fiddling duo earned much success after receiving a chance in New York City. From that point on, the group expanded and performed for packed houses across the U.S. and Europe. At each concert, solo performances demonstrate the uniqueness of the individual styles of music. The sounds from each musician represent their regional repertoires. Then together, they collaborate to provide dazzling energy and subtle grace. The quartet combines its considerable talents, rich musical traditions and spontaneous humor and, in return, experiences sold-out tours and standing ovations.
The Washington Post recognizes the group as “three of the finest folk violinists anywhere.” Kevin Burke is a world-renowned Irish fiddler who plays the highly ornamented style of Country Sligo. He is a recipient of the NEA’s National Heritage Award and one of The Celtic Fiddle Festival’s original musicians. Christian Lemaître joined the original duo early on to share the beautiful music of Brittany, France. He honed his fiddling skills by playing the hypnotic Breton melodies at night dances throughout Brittany. He is a founding member of the group Kornog. Charlie McKerron, the Scottish member, has won awards as a player and a composer. He is considered to be among the finest in a land famed for extraordinary fiddlers. G Nicolas Quemener is a master open-tuning guitarist from Angers, France. He studied percussion in the National School of Music, has been a part of many superb Celtic bands, including Arcady and Kornog, and continues to play and record with many acclaimed Breton and Irish artists.
Tickets can be purchased at the door, costing $20 for general admission and $5 for students and children.
Dedicated to the education, sales, documentation and perpetuation of the traditional arts in the mountain region, Mountain City Traditional Arts is a program of Frostburg State University, with support from FrostburgFirst, the Allegany Arts Council and the Maryland Traditions Program of the State Arts Council. For more information, email mountaincitytradarts@gmail.com or call 301-687-8040.
Situated in the mountains of Allegany County, Frostburg State University is one of the 12 institutions of the University System of Maryland. FSU is a comprehensive, residential regional university and serves as an educational and cultural center for Western Maryland. For more information, visit www.frostburg.edu or facebook.com/frostburgstateuniversity. Follow FSU on Twitter @frostburgstate.
FSU is committed to making all of its programs, services and activities accessible to persons with disabilities. To request accommodations through the ADA Compliance Office, call 301-687-4102 or use a Voice Relay Operator at 1-800-735-2258.

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

The Early Mays to bring Appalachian Harmony to Mountain City Traditional Arts



Emily Pinkerton, Ellen Gozion, and Rachel Eddy will be bringing enthralling three part harmonies, masterful instrumentation, and old-time Appalachian sound to Frostburg. The performance will take place at Mountain City Traditional Arts, 25 East Main Street in Frostburg, on September 11th  at 4:00pm. This is event is free and open to the public with a suggested donation of $15.
The three musicians, all accomplished solo artists in their own right, have come together combining fiddle, banjo, guitar, and vocal harmonies in a sound that captures old-time tradition and also their own individual styles. The three chart topping performers pour their souls into their music and derive joy from every aspect of touring, rehearsing, and performing.
Emily, a winner of the 2015 New Music USA grant, is popularly known for her unique songwriting that combines world music with classical and folk elements. Ellen , an American Music Abroad finalist, is a notable ballad singer and visual artist who has taught at the Augusta Heritage Center near Elkins West Virginia. Rachel, a West Virginia native, recently moved back to the US after touring in Europe for six years. She has performed with a variety of notable musicians including Bruce Molsky, Uncle Earl, and Tim O'Brien.
Dedicated to the education, sales, documentation and perpetuation of the traditional arts in the mountain region, Mountain City Traditional Arts is a program of Frostburg State University, with support from FrostburgFirst, the Allegany Arts Council, and the Maryland Traditions Program of the State Arts Council. For more information contact mountaincitytradarts@gmail.com or call 301-687-8040.
FSU is committed to making all of its programs, services and activities accessible to persons with disabilities. To request accommodations through the ADA Compliance Office, call 301-687-4102 or use a Voice Relay Operator at 1-800-735-2258.

Friday, June 3, 2016

MCTA Summer Line Up



Knitting Demonstration with Sarah Riffey- June 11th 2-4pm
             Sarah has been crafting and doing festivals in the area for the past several years. She makes scarves, hats, and bags and will be demonstrating and discussing her craft during the Second Saturday Sidewalk Sales. 

Tatting Workshops with Carolyn Groves- June 18th AND July 23rd 1pm-4pm
             1-1:30 will be for beginners. Learn the tatting double stitch and how to form rings and chains.
             1:45-4 the adventure continues using the skills from the first session. We will explore reading patterns, workings rings and chains to form an edging. We will discuss complex patterns, thread choices, and uses for modern tatting. New students must have basic skills to advance to the second session. Students from other workshops are welcome at the second session.

"History Through Folk Music" and Songwriting Workshop for Children with Jay Smar- July 16th @2pm

             "History Through Folk Music" - an interactive, informative yet fun music program for ages 8 through 12, involving  certain folk instrument early construction, their differences and similarities (such as the difference between a "fiddle" and a "violin"), as well as learning the "origin of" and "how to" perform a simple "clog dancing" step.
             Also coal mining stories such as the invention of  the first roller-coaster from a coal train in NE Pa titled the "Switchback Railroad" in Jim Thorpe. (45 to 60 minute program)
NE Pa coal mining photos, books, and other related NE Pa coal mining articles will be displayed.
             "Songwriting Workshop" - children create a simple song about a famous American historical figure. (45 to 60 minute program)

Soap Making Workshop with Andrea Lay of Hidden Hollow Farm- July 30th 10am-1pm

             Come by and learn how to make your very own herbal soap and even take home a sample! Limited to ten participants, $25 fee for the course.

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Mountain City Traditional Arts:A Project of Folklore and Folklife at Frostburg State University. Supported in Part by the Maryland Traditions Program of the Maryland State Arts Council, 25 East Main Street, Frostburg, MD;